Global Utilities

Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F110 - My muſe now hapy, lay thy ſelf to rest

Folger Image Folger Transcription Folger Modernisation PA Transcription PA Modernisation Urania Transcription Urania Modernisation
F110 F110mod P103 P103mod



My muſe now hapy, lay thy ſelf to rest
    sleepe in the quiett of a faithfull loue,
    write you noe more, butt lett thes phant'ſies moue
    ſome other harts, wake nott to new vnrest,

Butt if you study, bee thoſe thoughts adrest
    to truth, wch shall eternall goodnes proue;
    inioying of true ioye, the most, and best,
    the endles gaine wch neuer will remoue;

Leaue the diſcource of Venus, and her ſun
    to young beeginers, and theyr brains inspire
    wth storys of great loue, and from that fire
    gett heat to write the fortunes they haue wun,

And thus leaue of what's past showes you can loue,
Now lett your constancy your honor proue;

Pamphilia

Crown sonnet 2.9 ('My muse now happy')

My Muse, now happy, lay thyself to rest,
    Sleep in the quiet of a faithful love,
    Write you no more, but let these fancies move
    Some other hearts; wake not to new unrest,

But if you study, be those thoughts addressed
    To truth, which shall eternal goodness prove;
    Enjoying of true joy, the most, and best,
    The endless gain which never will remove.

Leave the discourse of Venus and her son*
    To young beginners, and their brains inspire
    With stories of great love, and from that fire
    Get heat to write the fortunes they have won,

And thus leave off:* what's past shows you can love,
    Now let your constancy your honour prove.

Pamphilia


This sonnet is moved in P to be the final sonnet [P103] in the sequence printed at the end of Urania (fols. 47-8); the signature of 'Pamphilia' is replaced by 'FINIS'. While in the manuscript it is followed by other poems, the fact that it is there signed 'Pamphilia' (and its theme) indicate that it concludes the sequence if not the MS volume as a whole. The sonnet seems like a resolution of not just 'Pamphilia's' dismay at being subject to desire for an unreliable lover, but also a resolution of Wroth's treatment of love and desire from a female perspective.

'son': 'sun' in the MS, 'son' in P and in this case while a pun on son/sun may be present at some distance, 'son' is surely the primary meaning in context.
'off': 'of' in MS, 'off' in P and off seems intended.
9.

My Muſe now happy lay thy ſelfe to reſt,
    Sleepe in the quiet of a faithfull loue,
    Write you no more, but let theſe Phant'ſies mooue
    Some other hearts, wake not to new vnreſt.

But if you Study be thoſe thoughts adreſt
    To truth, which ſhall eternall goodnes prooue;
    Enioying of true ioy the moſt, and beſt
    The endles gaine which neuer will remoue.

Leaue the diſcourſe of Venus, and her ſonne
    To young beginners, and their braines inſpire
    With ſtoryes of great Loue, and from that fire,
    Get heat to write the fortunes they haue wonne.

And thus leaue off; what's paſt ſhewes you can loue,
Now let your Conſtancy your Honor proue.

FINIS.
Crown sonnet 2.9 ('My muse now happy')

My Muse, now happy, lay thyself to rest,
    Sleep in the quiet of a faithful love,
    Write you no more, but let these fancies move
    Some other hearts; wake not to new unrest,

But if you study, be those thoughts addressed
    To truth, which shall eternal goodness prove;
    Enjoying of true joy, the most, and best,
    The endless gain which never will remove.

Leave the discourse of Venus and her son
    To young beginners, and their brains inspire
    With stories of great love, and from that fire
    Get heat to write the fortunes they have won,

And thus leave off: what's past shows you can love,
    Now let your constancy your honour prove.



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