Global Utilities

Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F109 - How gloewoorme like the ſunn doth now apeere

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8.

How gloewoorme like the ſunn doth now apeere
    colde beames doe from his gloriouſe face deſend
    wch showes his days, and force draw to an end,
    or that to leaue taking his time growes neere,

This day his face did ſeeme butt pale, though cleere
    the reaſon is hee to the north must lend
    his light, and warmth must to that climate bend
    whoſe frozen parts cowld nott loues heat hold deere,

Alas if thou (bright ſun) to part from hence
    grieue ſoe, what must I haples? who from thence
    wher thou dost goe my bleſsing shall attend

Thou shalt inioye that ſight for wch I dy,
    and in my hart thy fortunes doe enuy,
    yett grieue, I'le loue thee, for this state may mend


Crown sonnet 2.8 ('How glowworm like the sun')

How glowworm-like the sun doth now appear,
    Cold beams do from his glorious face descend,
    Which shows his days and force draw to an end,
    Or that to leave-taking his time grows near.

This* day his face did seem but pale, though clear,
    The reason is: he to the North must lend
    His light, and warmth must to that climate bend
    Whose frozen parts could not love's heat hold dear.

Alas if thou (bright sun) to part from hence
    Grieve so, what must I, hapless, who from thence
    Where thou dost go my blessing shall attend?

Thou shalt enjoy that sight for which I die,
    And in my heart thy fortunes do envy --
    Yet grieve, I'll love thee, for this state may mend.*


Roberts notes a parallel with the imagery of John Donne's 'A Nocturnal Upon St Lucy's day':

    'Tis the year's midnight, and it is the day's,
    Lucy's, who scarce seven hours herself unmasks ;
    The sun is spent, and now his flasks
    Send forth light squibs, no constant rays ;
    The world's whole sap is sunk ;
    The general balm th' hydroptic earth hath drunk,
    Whither, as to the bed's-feet, life is shrunk,
    Dead and interred ; yet all these seem to laugh,
    Compared with me, who am their epitaph.

'This' = 'thee' in P.
'mend' = ' 'mend' in P: the apostrophe indicating an abbreviation of amend which may also be intended in F.
8.


How Glowworme-like the Sun doth now appeare,
    Cold beames doe from his glorious face deſcend
    Which ſhewes his daies, and force draw to an ende,
    Or that to leaue taking, his time growes neere.

The day his face did ſeeme but pale, though cleare,
    The reaſon is, he to the North muſt lend
    His light, and warmth muſt to that Climat bend,
    Whoſe frozen parts could not loues heat hold deare

Alas, if thou bright Sunne to part from hence
    Grieue ſo, what muſt I hapleſſe who from thence,
    Where thou doſt goe my bleſſing ſhall attend;

Thou ſhalt enioy that ſight for which I dye,
    And in my heart thy fortunes doe enuy,
    Yet grieue, I'le loue thee, for this ſtate may 'mend.
Crown sonnet 2.8 ('How glowworm like the sun')

How glowworm-like the sun doth now appear,
    Cold beams do from his glorious face descend,
    Which shows his days and force draw to an end,
    Or that to leave-taking his time grows near.

The day his face did seem but pale, though clear,
    The reason is: he to the North must lend
    His light, and warmth must to that climate bend
    Whose frozen parts could not love's heat hold dear.

Alas if thou (bright sun) to part from hence
    Grieve so, what must I, hapless, who from thence
    Where thou dost go my blessing shall attend?

Thou shalt enjoy that sight for which I die,
    And in my heart thy fortunes do envy --
    Yet grieve, I'll love thee, for this state may 'mend.*


'mend: if the initial apostrophe is intended this is an abbreviation for amend, perhaps with a pun on 'mend'.


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