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Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F97 - Sweet lett mee inioye thy ſight

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F97 F97mod P91 P91mod

I.

Sweet lett mee inioye thy ſight
    more cleere, more bright then morning ſun,
wch in spring time giues delight
    and by wch ſomers pride is wun,

Preſent ſight doth pleaſures moue
    wch in ſad abſence wee must miſs,
butt when mett againe in loue
    then twiſe redoubled is our bliſs,

Yett this comfort abſence giues,
    and butt faithfull louing tries
that though parted, loues force liues
    as iust in hart as in our eyes;

Butt ſuch comfort bannish quite
    farr ſweeter is itt still to finde
fauour in thy loued ſight
    wch preſent ſmiles wth ioyes combind

Eyes of gladnes, lips of loue,
    and harts from paſsion nott to turne,
butt in ſweet affections moue
    in flames of faith to liue, and burne,

Dearest then this kindnes giue,
    and grant mee lyfe wch is your ſight
wherin I more bleſsed liue
    then graced wth the ſuns faire light


Crown Song 1 ('Sweet let me enjoy')

Sweet let me enjoy thy sight
    More clear, more bright than morning $un,
    Which in Springtime gives delight
    And by which Summer's pride is won,

Present sight doth pleasures move
    Which in sad absence we must miss,
    But when met again in love
    Then twice redoubled is our bliss.

Yet this comfort absence gives,
    And but* faithful loving tries
    That though parted, love's force lives
    As just in heart as in our eyes;

But such comfort banish quite
    Far sweeter is it still to find
    Favour in thy loved sight
    Which present smiles with joys combined.

Eyes of gladness, lips of love,
    And hearts from passion not to turn,
    But in sweet affections move
    In flames of faith to live, and burn,

Dearest then this kindness give,
    And grant me life which is your sight
    Wherein I more blessed live
    Than graced with the sun's fair light.


Roberts [P91] notes that the opening of this song resembles RS song 20:

    Sense by unjust force banished
    From the objects of your pleasure
    Now of you all end is vanished
    You who late possessed more treasure.

In P the structure is changed to three 8 line stanzas.

'but' = 'only' in P.
Song. I.


Sweet, let me enioy thy ſight
    More cleare, more bright then morning Sun,
Which in Spring-time giues delight
    And by which Summers pride is wun.
Preſent ſight doth pleaſures moue
    Which in ſad abſence we muſt miſſe:
But when met againe in loue,
    Then twice redoubled is our bliſſe.

Yet this comfort abſence giues,
    And only faithfull louing tries,
That though parted, Loues force liues
    As iuſt in heart, as in our eyes:
But ſuch comfort baniſh quite,
    Farre ſweeter is it, ſtill to finde
Fauour in thy loued ſight,
    Which preſent ſmiles with ioyes combind.

Eyes of gladneſſe, lipps of Loue,
    And hearts from paſsion not to turne,
But in ſweet affections mooue,
    In flames of Faith to liue, and burne.
Deareſt then, this kindneſſe giue,
    And grant me life, which is your ſight,
Wherein I more bleſſed liue,
    Then graced with the Sunnes faire light.
Crown Song 1 ('Sweet let me enjoy')

Sweet let me enjoy thy sight
    More clear, more bright than morning $un,
    Which in Springtime gives delight
    And by which Summer's pride is won,
    Present sight doth pleasures move
    Which in sad absence we must miss,
    But when met again in love
    Then twice redoubled is our bliss.

Yet this comfort absence gives,
    And only faithful loving tries
    That though parted, love's force lives
    As just in heart as in our eyes;
    But such comfort banish quite
    Far sweeter is it still to find
    Favour in thy loved sight
    Which present smiles with joys combined.

Eyes of gladness, lips of love,
    And hearts from passion not to turn,
    But in sweet affections move
    In flames of faith to live, and burn,
    Dearest then this kindness give,
    And grant me life which is your sight
    Wherein I more blessed live
    Than graced with the sun's fair light.



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