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Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F66 - In night yett may wee ſee ſome kind of light

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Sonett I.

In night yett may wee ſee ſome kind of light
    when as the Moone doth pleaſe to show her face,
    and in the Sunns roome yeelds her ſight, and grace
    wch otherwiſe must ſuffer dullest night;

Soe ar my fortunes, bard from true delight
    colde, and vnſertaine, like to this strang place,
    decreaſing, changing in an instant space,
    and euen att full of ioy turn'd to despite;

Iustly on Fortune was beestow'd the wheele
    Whoſe fauors ficle, and vnconstant reele;
    drunk wth delight of chang, and ſodaine paine;

Wher pleaſure hath noe ſettled place of stay
    butt turning still for our best hopes decay,
    And this (alas) wee louers often gaine;
Sonnet 1

In night yet may we see some kind of light
    When as the moon doth please to show her face,
    And in the sun's room yields her sight, and grace
    Which otherwise must suffer dullest night;

So are my fortunes, barred from true delight
    Cold, and uncertain, like to this strange place,
    Decreasing, changing in an instant space,
    And even at* full of joy turned to despite;

Justly on Fortune was bestowed the wheel
    Whose favours, fickle, and unconstant, reel,
    Drunk with delight of change, and sudden pain;

Where pleasure hath no settled place of stay
    But turning still, for our best hopes decay,
    And this (alas) we lovers often gain.


This is the beginning of a sequence of ten sonnets following on from a sequence of songs.

'at': probably an error and should be deleted.
Sonnet. I.

In night yet may we ſee ſome kinde of light,
    When as the Moone doth pleaſe to ſhew her face,
    And in the Sunns roome yeelds her light, and grace,
    Which otherwiſe muſt ſuffer dulleſt night:

So are my fortunes barrd from true delight,
    Cold, and vncertaine, like to this ſtrange place,
    Decreaſing, changing in an inſtant ſpace,
    And euen at full of ioy turnd to deſpight.

Iuſtly on Fortune was beſtowd the Wheele,
    Whoſe fauours fickle, and vnconſtant reele,
    Drunke with delight of change and ſudden paine;

Where pleaſure hath no ſetled place of ſtay,
    But turning ſtill, for our beſt hopes decay,
    And this (alas) we louers often gaine.
Sonnet 1

In night yet may we see some kind of light
    When as the moon doth please to show her face,
    And in the sun's room yields her sight, and grace
    Which otherwise must suffer dullest night;

So are my fortunes, barred from true delight
    Cold, and uncertain, like to this strange place,
    Decreasing, changing in an instant space,
    And even at full of joy turned to despite;

Justly on Fortune was bestowed the wheel
    Whose favours, fickle, and unconstant, reel;
    Drunk with delight of change, and sudden pain;

Where pleasure hath no settled place of stay
    But turning still, for our best hopes decay,
    And this (alas) we lovers often gain.



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