Global Utilities

Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F51 - How fast thou hast'st (o spring) wt ſwiftest speed

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44.

How fast thou hast'st (o spring) wt ſwiftest speed
    to catch thy waters wch befor are runn,
    and of the greater riuers wellcom wunn,
    'ere thes thy new borne streames thes places feed,

Yett doe yow well least staying heere might breed
    dangerous floods yor ſweetest banks t'o'rerunn,
    and yett much better my distreſs to shunn
    wch makes my teares butt yor courſe to ſucceed,

Butt best you doe when wth ſoe hasty flight,
    you fly my ills wch now my ſelf outgoe,
    whoſe broken hart can testify ſuch woe,
    wch ſoe o'recharg'd my lyfe blood wasteth quite

Sweet spring then keepe your way, Bee neuer spent
and my ill days, or griefs aſsunder rent
44.

How fast thou hastest (O Spring) with swiftest* speed
    To catch thy waters* which before are run,
    And of the greater rivers welcome won,
    Ere these thy new-born streams these places feed,

Yet do you* well lest staying here might breed
    Dangerous floods your sweetest banks t' o'er-run,
    And yet much better my distress to shun
    Which makes my tears but your course to* succeed,

But best you do when with so hasty flight,
    You fly my ills which now my self outgo,
    Whose broken heart can testify such woe,
    Which* so o'ercharged my life blood wasteth quite

Sweet spring then keep your way, be never spent
    And my ill days, or griefs asunder rent.


'swiftest': = 'sweetest' in P.
'waters' = 'water' in P.
'do you' = 'you do' in P.
'but your course to': = 'your swiftest course' in P.
'which' = 'that' in P.
44.

How faſt thou haſt ſt O Spring with ſweeteſt ſpeed)
    To catch thy water which before are runne,
    And of the greater Riuers welcome woone,
    Ere theſe thy new-borne ſtreames theſe places feede.

Yet you doe well, leſt ſtaying here might breede
    Dangerous flouds, your ſweeteſt bankes t'orerunn,
    And yet much better my diſtreſſe to ſhunn,
    Which maks my tears your ſwifteſt courſe ſucceed.

But beſt you doe when with ſo haſty flight
    You fly my ills, which now my ſelfe outgoe,
    Whoſe broken heart can teſtifie ſuch woe,
    That ſo orecharg'd, my life-bloud, waſteth quite.

Sweet Spring then keepe your way be neuer ſpent,
And my ill dayes, or griefes, aſſunder rent.
44.

How fast thou hastest (O Spring) with sweetest speed
    to catch thy water which before are run,
    and of the greater rivers welcome won,
    'ere these thy new-born streams these places feed,

Yet you do well lest staying here might breed
    dangerous floods your sweetest banks t' o'er-run,
    and yet much better my distress to shun
    which makes my tears your swiftest course succeed,

But best you do when with so hasty flight,
    you fly my ills which now my self outgo,
    whose broken heart can testify such woe,
    that so o'ercharged my life blood wasteth quite

Sweet spring then keep your way, be never spent
    and my ill days, or griefs asunder rent.



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