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Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F44 - What pleaſure can a bannish'd creature haue

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38

What pleaſure can a bannish'd creature haue
    in all the pastimes that inuented arr
    by witt or learning, abſence making warr
    against all peace that may a biding craue;

Can wee delight butt in a wellcome graue
    wher wee may bury paines, and ſoe bee farr
    from lothed company who allways iarr
    vpon the string of mirthe that pastime gaue;

The knowing part of ioye is deem'd the hart
    if that bee gon what ioy can ioy impart
    when ſencleſs is the feeler of our mirth;

Noe, I ame bannish'd, and no good shall find
    butt all my fortunes must wth miſchief bind
    Who butt for miſerie did gaine a birth;
38.

What pleasure can a banished creature have
    In all the pastimes that invented are
    By wit or learning, absence making war
    Against all peace that may a biding* crave;

Can we delight but in a welcome grave
    Where we may bury pains, and so be far
    From loathed company who always jar
    Upon the string of mirth that pastime gave;

The knowing part of joy is deemed the heart,
    If that be gone what joy can joy impart
    When senseless is the feeler of our mirth?

No, I am banished, and no good shall find
    But all my fortunes must with mischief bind,
    Who but for misery did gain a birth.


Roberts notes the idea of being alone in company in AS 27: 'Because I oft in dark abstracted guise/Seem most alone in greatest company'. But Astrophil goes on to talk of this leading to him being mistaken as proud, while in Wroth's rather darker sonnet Pamphilia is not only alone, but bereft of all feeling.

'biding': a home.
38.

What pleaſure can a baniſh'd creature haue
    In all the paſtimes that inuented are
    By wit or learning? Abſence making warre
    Againſt all peace that may a biding craue.

Can wee delight but in a welcome graue,
    Where we may bury paines? and ſo be farre
    From loathed company, who alwaies iarre
    Vpon the ſtring of mirth that paſtime gaue.

The knowing part of ioy is deem'd the heart,
    If that be gone what ioy can ioy impart
    When ſenſleſſe is the feeler of our mirth?

No, I am baniſh'd and no good ſhall finde,
    But all my fortunes muſt with miſchiefe binde;
    Who but for miſery did gaine a birth.
38.

What pleasure can a banished creature have
    In all the pastimes that invented are
    By wit or learning, absence making war
    Against all peace that may a biding crave;

Can we delight but in a welcome grave
    Where we may bury pains, and so be far
    From loathed company who always jar
    Upon the string of mirth that pastime gave;

The knowing part of joy is deemed the heart,
    If that be gone what joy can joy impart
    When senseless is the feeler of our mirth?

No, I am banished, and no good shall find
    But all my fortunes must with mischief bind,
    Who but for misery did gain a birth.



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