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Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F43 - Night, welcome art thou to my mind destrest

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37.

Night, welcome art thou to my mind destrest
    darke, heauy, ſad, yett nott more ſad then I
    neuer could'st thou find fitter company
    for thine owne humor then I thus oprest.

If thou bee dark, my wrongs still vnredrest
    ſaw neuer light, nor ſmalest bliſs can spy;
    If heauy, ioy from mee too fast doth hy
    and care outgoes my hope of quiett rest,

Then now in freindship ioine wt haples mee,
    who ame as ſad, and dark as thou canst bee
    hating all pleaſure, or delight in lyfe;

Silence, and griefe, wth thee I best doe loue
    and from you three, I know I can nott moue
    Then lett vs liue companions wthout strife
37.

Night, welcome art thou to my mind distressed,
    Dark, heavy, sad, yet not more sad than I;
    Never could'st thou find fitter company
    For thine own humour then I thus oppressed.

If thou be* dark, my wrongs still unredressed
    Saw never light, nor smallest bliss can spy;
    If heavy, joy from me too fast doth hie
    And care outgoes my hope of quiet rest,

Then now in friendship join with hapless me,
    Who am as sad, and dark as thou canst bee
    Hating all pleasure, or delight in* life;

Silence, and grief, with thee I best do love
    And from you three, I know I cannot move.
    Then let us live companions without strife.


This sonnet in praise of night harks back to the opening sonnet ('When night's black mantle could most darkness prove') and other evocations, such as [P13]. Roberts notes that the trio specifically addressed here, night, silence and grief, feature in AS 96:

    Thought, with good cause thou lik'st so well the night,
    Since kind or chance gives both one livery,
    Both sadly black, both blackly darkened be;
    Night bard from Sun, thou from thy own sunlight;
    Silence in both displays his sullen might;
    Slow heaviness in both holds one degree
    That full of doubts, thou of perplexity;
    Thy tears express Night's native moisture right

In P rearranged to form three quatrains and a couplet.

'bee' = 'beest' in P.
'in' = 'of' in P.
37.

Night, welcome art thou to my minde diſtreſt,
    Darke, heauy, ſad, yet not more ſad then I:
    Neuer could'ſt thou finde fitter company
    For thine owne humour, then I thus oppreſt.

If thou beeſt darke, my wrongs ſtill vnredreſt
    Saw neuer light, nor ſmalleſt bliſſe can ſpye:
    If heauy ioy from mee to faſt doth hie,
    And care out-goes my hope of quiet reſt.

Then now in friendſhip ioyne with hapleſſe me,
    Who am as ſad and darke as thou canſt be,
    Hating all pleaſure or delight of life,
    Silence and griefe, with thee I beſt doe loue.

And from you three I know I cannot moue,
Then let vs liue companions without ſtrife.
37.

Night, welcome art thou to my mind distressed,
    Dark, heavy, sad, yet not more sad than I;
    Never could'st thou find fitter company
    For thine own humour then I thus oppressed.

If thou beest dark, my wrongs still unredressed
    Saw never light, nor smallest bliss can spy;
    If heavy, joy from me too fast doth hie
    And care outgoes my hope of quiet rest,

Then now in friendship join with hapless me,
    Who am as sad, and dark as thou canst bee
    Hating all pleasure, or delight of life;
    Silence, and grief, with thee I best do love

And from you three, I know I cannot move.
    Then let us live companions without strife.



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