Global Utilities

Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F23 - The Sunn wch glads, the earth att his bright ſight

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.20.

The Sunn wch glads, the earth att his bright ſight
    When in the morne hee showes his golden face,
    and takes the place from t├Ždious drowſy night
    making the world still happy by his grace;

Shewes hapines remaines nott in one place,
    nor may the heauens, alone to vs giue light,
    butt hide that cheerfull face, though noe long space,
    yett long enough for triall of theyr might;

Butt neuer ſunn=ſett could bee ſoe obſcure
    no deſart euer haue a shade ſoe ſadd,
    nor could black darknes euer proue ſoe badd
    as paines wch abſence makes mee now indure;

The miſsing of the ſunn awhile makes night
butt abſence of my ioy ſees neuer Light
20.

The Sun which glads the earth at his bright sight
    When in the morn he shows his golden face,
    And takes the place from tedious drowsy night
    Making the world still happy by* his grace;

Shows happiness remains not in one place,
    Nor may the heavens, alone to us give light,
    But hide that cheerful face, though no long space,
    Yet long enough for trial of their might;

But never sunset could be so obscure
    No desert ever have* a shade so sad,
    Nor could black darkness ever prove se bad
    As pains which absence makes me now endure;

The missing of the sun awhile makes night,
    But absence of my joy sees never Light.


Roberts [P23] notes a range of parallel uses of the sun/night/absence images, including AS 91:

    I am from you, light of my life, misled,
    And whiles, fair you, my sun, thus overspread
    With Absence veil, I live in Sorrow's night;

See also AS 96:

    Thought, with good cause thou lik'st so well the night,
    Since kind or chance gives both one livery,
    Both sadly black, both blackly darkened be;
    Night barred from Sun, thou from thy own sunlight;

See also RS 30:

    Absence, I cannot say thou hid'st my light
     Not darkened, but for ay set is my sun

But in Wroth's case this sonnet becomes more complex when compared with 22 [P25], 'Like to the Indians', which gives the sun a more ambiguous character.

'by' = 'in' in P
'have' = 'had' in P
20.

The Sunne which glads the earth at his bright ſight,
    When in the morne he ſhowes his golden face,
    And takes the place from tedious drowſie Night.
    Making the world ſtill happy in his grace.

Shewes happineſſe remaines not in one place,
    Nor may the Heauens alone to vs giue light,
    But hide that cheerefull face, though no long ſpace,
    Yet long enough for tryall of their might.

But neuer Sun-ſet could be ſo obſcure,
    No Deſart euer had a ſhade ſo ſad:
    Nor could black darkneſſe euer proue ſo bad,
    As paines which abſence makes me now indure.

The miſſing of the Sunne a while makes Night,
But abſence of my ioy ſees neuer light.
20.

The Sun which glads the earth at his bright sight
    When in the morn he shows his golden face,
    And takes the place from tedious drowsy night
    Making the world still happy in his grace;

Shows happiness remains not in one place,
    Nor may the heavens, alone to us give light,
    But hide that cheerful face, though no long space,
    Yet long enough for trial of their might;

But never sunset could be so obscure
    No desert ever had a shade so sad,
    Nor could black darkness ever prove se bad
    As pains which absence makes me now endure;

The missing of the sun awhile makes night,
    But absence of my joy sees never Light.



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