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Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F17 - Loue like a jugler, comes to play his priſe

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.15.

Loue like a jugler, comes to play his priſe,
    and all minds draw his wonders to admire,
    to ſee how cuningly hee, wanting eyes,
    can yett deſeaue the best ſight of deſire:

The wanton child, how hee can faine his fire
    ſo pretely, as none ſees his diſguiſe;
    how finely doe his tricks, while wee fooles hire
    the image maske, and ſeruice of his tirannies,

For in the end, ſuch iugling doth hee make
    as hee our harts, in stead of eyes doth take
    for men can only by theyr slieghts abuſe

The ſight wth nimble, and delightfull skill;
    butt if hee play, his gaine is our lost will:
    yett childlike, wee can nott his sports refuſe;
15.

Love like a juggler, comes to play his prize,
    And all minds draw* his wonders to admire,
    To see how cunningly he, wanting eyes,
    Can yet deceive the best sight of desire:

The wanton child, how he can fain his fire
    So prettily, as none sees his disguise;
    How finely do his tricks, while we fools hire
    The mask* and service* of his tyrannies,

For in the end, such juggling doth he* make
    As he our hearts, in stead of eyes doth take
    For men can only by their sleights abuse

The sight with nimble, and delightful skill;
    But if he play, his gain is our lost will:
    Yet childlike, we cannot his sports refuse.


In P this sonnet is moved to the sequence that begins on fol. 29 after Song 'Fairest and truest eyes'.

'all minds draw': the sense here is of people drawing near to a trickster (ie juggler) who will trick them with sleight of hand tricks.

'mask' = 'image' in P; in F 'image' is crossed out and 'maske' written above it.
'service' = 'office' in P.
'doth he' = 'he doth' in P.
2.

Loue like a Iugler comes to play his prize,
    And all mindes draw his wonders to admire,
    To ſee how cunningly he (wanting eyes)
    Can yet deceiue the beſt ſight of deſire.

The wanton Childe, how he can faine his fire
    So prettily, as none ſees his diſguiſe,
    How finely doe his trickes; while we fooles hire
    The badge, and office of his tyrannies.

For in the ende ſuch Iugling he doth make,
    As he our hearts inſtead of eyes doth take;
    For men can onely by their ſlights abuſe,

The ſight with nimble, and delightfull skill,
    But if he play, his gaine is our loſt will,
    Yet Child-like we cannot his ſports refuſe.
Sonnet 2.

Love like a juggler, comes to play his prize,
    And all minds draw his wonders to admire,
    To see how cunningly he, wanting eyes,
    Can yet deceive the best sight of desire:

The wanton child, how he can fain his fire
    So prettily, as none sees his disguise;
    How finely do his tricks, while we fools hire
    The badge and office of his tyrannies,

For in the end, such juggling he doth make
    As he our hearts, in stead of eyes doth take
    For men can only by their sleights abuse

The sight with nimble, and delightful skill;
    But if he play, his gain is our lost will:
    Yet childlike, we cannot his sports refuse.



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