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Mary Wroth's Poetry: An Electronic Edition

Wroth Poem - F8 - Loue leaue to vrge, thou know'st thou hast yr hand

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.7.

Loue leaue to vrge, thou know'st thou hast ye hand;
    'T'is cowardiſe to striue wher none reſist:
    Pray thee leaue of, I yeeld vnto thy band;
    Doe nott thus, still, in thine owne powre perſist,

B....eehold I yeeld: lett forces bee dismist;
    I ame your ſubiect conquer'd, bound doe stand,
    neuer your foe, butt did your claime assist
    ſeeking your due of thoſe who did wt=stand;

Butt now, itt ſeemes, you would I should you loue;
    I doe confeſs, t'was you, made mee first chuſe;
    and yor faire showes made mee a louer proue
    when I my freedome did, for paine refuſe

Yett this Sr God, yor boyship I dispiſe;
Your charmes I' obay, butt loue nott want of eyes
7.

Love leave to urge, thou know'st thou hast the hand;
    'T'is cowardice to strive where none resist:
    Pray thee leave of,* I yield unto thy band;
    Do not thus, still, in thine own power persist,

Behold I yield: let forces be dismissed;
    I am your* subject conquered, bound do* stand,
    Never your* foe, but did your* claim assist
    Seeking your* due of those who did withstand;

But now, it seems, you would* I should you* love;
    I do confess, 'twas you, made me first* choose;
    And your* faire shows made me a lover prove
    when I my freedom did, for pain refuse

Yet this Sir God, your boyship I despise;
    Your charms I obey, but love not want of eyes.


The personification of Cupid is a prominent part of Wroth's poetry and also within Love's Victory. Roberts (her P8) notes that the mocking address to 'Sir God' echoes AS 53, but see also AS 61 where he is addressed as 'Dr Cupid'.

'of' = 'off' in P.
'your' = 'thy' in P. (all instances of 'your' changed to 'thy' in P).
'do' = 'to' in P.
'you would' = 'thou wouldst' in P.
'you' = 'thee' in P.
'you, made me first' = 'thy will made me' in P.

While the F use of 'your' seems more modern to us, and more colloquial, at the time Wroth wrote, the distinction between 'your' and 'thy' or 'you' and 'thou' was mostly to do with rank and status. So 'you' is appropriate as an address to one's superior, 'thou' is a more familiar usage and would normally be used for one's inferior - although these are not hard and fast rules. So the change from the 'your' of F to 'thy' of P could be either authorial or the work of the typesetter of P, and could in either case indicate a notion that this sonnet should be consistent and not move from 'thy' to 'your', or it could be reconceptualizing the relationship between Pamphilia and Cupid and making it more casual as the speaker offers the teasing soubriquet 'sir God' and the demeaning 'boyship'.
7

Loue leaue to vrge, thou knoweſt thou haſt the hand
    'Tis Cowardize to ſtriue where none reſiſt,
    Pray thee leaue of, I yeeld vnto thy band,
    Doe not thus ſtill in thine owne power perſiſt.

Behold, I yeeld; let forces be diſmiſt,
    I am thy Subiect conquer'd bound to ſtand
    Neuer thy foe, but did thy claime aſſiſt,
    Seeking thy due of thoſe who did withſtand.

But now it ſeemes thou would'ſt I ſhould thee loue,
    I doe confeſſe, 'twas thy will made mee chooſe,
    And thy faire ſhewes made me a Louer proue,
    When I my freedome did for paine refuſe.

Yet this, Sir god, your Boy-ſhip I deſpiſe,
Your charmes I obey, but loue not want of eyes.
7.

Love leave to urge, thou know'st thou hast the hand;
    'T'is cowardice to strive where none resist:
    Pray thee leave off, I yield unto thy band;
    Do not thus, still, in thine own power persist,

Behold I yield: let forces be dismissed;
    I am thy subject conquered, bound to stand,
    Never thy foe, but did thy claim assist
    Seeking thy due of those who did withstand;

Butt now, it seems, thou wouldst I should thee love;
    I do confess, t'was thy will made me choose;
    And thy faire shows made me a lover prove
    When I my freedom did, for pain refuse

Yet this Sir God, your boyship I despise;
    Your charms I obey, but love not want of eyes.



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